Posts Tagged ‘short stories’

07
Sep

Short Story Writing Tips

We all love short stories, but the appeal of these works isn’t just their brevity – short stories are often the perfect genre for exploration, experimentation and the honing of your writing skills. Some of history’s most famous authors, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, JD Salinger, published notable collections of their short fiction. Ernest Hemingway’s great works, including the Old Man and the Sea are considered long short stories (or novellas) and are an extension of this genre.

Short stories are brief and powerful in their succinctness. Good short stories have well developed characters, story lines and settings just like a full length novel. They’re often a great starting point for beginning writers enrolled in their first creative writing courses. And they’re fun to write!

There are some notable differences between developing a novel and a short story. Here are some tips to keep in mind for short story writing:

Don’t skimp on the basics – you need a beginning, middle and end as well as strongly developed characters, a setting – everything you would include in a novel. You may find yourself streamlining some of your concepts but all of the essential parts need to be there.

Stick to a single simple idea – because your story is brief, you’ll want to follow a single idea or theme to its completion. Including too many twists and turns could confuse your reader – save these for longer works.

Stay with fewer characters – each new character adds more depth and complexity to your story. By focusing and honing in on just a few key subjects, you’ll be able to develop them more thoroughly in your short story.

Stick to a short time frame – a successful short story covers a short time frame thoroughly and in fine detail – you don’t want to be giving a brief overview of a character’s entire life. Paint a short story as you would a single scene from a screenplay – be as descriptive and as detailed as you can be about a brief passing of time.

Brainstorm and develop your story – you as the writer should know everything about your characters, from what they eat for breakfast to how they sleep at night. While these details may be left out of your final work, the brainstorming process should be thorough and complete.

Be creative and explorative – short stories are the perfect way to develop your writing skills and experiment. Try a new voice or explore a different genre and style of writing. Many short stories continue to develop into full fledged manuscripts and ideas.

There you have it, some easy to work with short story writing tips. Now go and get creative by writing an inspiring story! If you need more tips, why not check out some other short story articles.

Search terms:
  • short story essay examples
  • short story essay example
  • creative essay tips
  • example of essay story
  • essay story example
  • story essay examples
  • write a short essay based on a true famous frendship story
  • essay story writing
21
Jul

How to Write a Short Story – #2

  1. Decide who will tell the story. There are three main points of view from which to tell a story: first-person (“I”), second-person (“you”), and third-person (“he” or “she”). In a first-person story, a character in the story tells the story; in the second-person the reader is made a character in the story; and in the third-person, an outside narrator tells the story. (Second-person narration is rarely used.) Keep in mind that first-person narrators can only tell what they know (which will be limited to what they see firsthand or are told by others), while third-person narrators can either know everything and explore every character’s thoughts, or be limited to only that which can be observed.
  2. Organize your thoughts. After you have prepared the basic elements of your story, it can be helpful to do out a time-line in some way to help you decide what should happen when. Your story should consist at least of an introduction, conflict, rising action, climax, and resolution. You can draw or write a visual with very simple descriptions of what should happen in each of these stages. Having this done will help you keep focused when writing the story, and you can easily make changes to it, so that you are able to keep a steady flow as you write the full story.
  3. Start writing. Depending on how thoroughly you’ve sketched out your plot and characters, the actual writing process may simply be one of choosing the right words. Generally, however, writing is arduous. You probably won’t know your characters and plot as well as you thought but it doesn’t matter. Outlines are not the same as stories, and actually writing a story is the only way to complete one.
  4. Come out swinging. The first page—some would say the first sentence—of any writing should grab the reader’s attention and leave him/her wanting more. A quick start is especially important in short stories because you don’t have much room to tell your story. Don’t dillydally with long introductions of the characters or uninteresting descriptions of the setting: get right into the plot, and reveal details about the characters and setting piece-by-piece as you go along.
  5. Keep writing. You’re almost certain to hit some bumps in the road to finishing your story. You’ve got to work through them, though. Set aside a time to write each and every day, and make it a goal to finish, say, a page each day. Even if you end up throwing away what you wrote on that day, you’ve been writing and thinking about the story, and that will keep you going in the long run.

From WikiHow

19
Jul

How to Write a Short Story – #1

For any aspiring professional writer, the short story is the perfect medium. While writing a novel is a Herculean task, just about anybody can craft and, most importantly, finish, a short story. That doesn’t mean that short stories are easy to write, though, and it certainly doesn’t mean that they aren’t as artistic and valuable as novels. With practice, patience, and a passion for writing, they can be every bit as moving and memorable as their much longer cousins.

  1. Nothing can help you “learn” how to write a good short story better than reading good short stories. Take note of the style and how they have used the small amount of words to their advantage. Choose authors that you enjoy, and also choose some of the “classics.” Pay attention to how the authors develop their characters, write dialogue, and structure their plots.
  2. Gather ideas for your story. Inspiration can strike at any time, so carry a notepad with you wherever you go so that you can write down story ideas as they come to you. Most of the time, you’ll just think of small snippets of information (a catastrophic event around which you can build a plot, a character’s name or appearance, etc.), but sometimes you’ll get lucky and a whole story will reveal itself to you in a couple of minutes. If you have trouble finding inspiration, or if you need to write a story in a hurry (for a class, for example), learn how to brainstorm.
  3. Choose an idea and start with basics of a short story. At the very least, a story should have an exposition (the story leading up to the climax), rising action (events leading to the turning point), a climax (a turning point in a story brought about by conflict between characters or within a character), falling action (your story begins to conclude), and a resolution (a satisfying ending to the story in which the central conflict is resolved – or not). Move backward or forward from your starting idea (it may or may not be the beginning of the story), and ask “What happens next?” or “what happened before this?”
  4. Know your characters. For a story to be believable, the characters have to be believable, and their actions should appear inevitable given who they are. In other words, you should know as much as possible about your characters, from what their central motivations are to what their favorite foods are. You won’t include all this information in your story, but the more you know, the more your characters will come to life, both for you and for the reader. Sometimes it helps just to listen to unimportant conversations between characters in your head, even if it won’t be in the story. If you find it easier, write a list, titled with the character’s name, and write all the attributes you can think of, from their position in the orchestra to their favourite colour. Write it all.
  5. Limit the breadth of your story. A novel can occur over millions of years and include a multitude of subplots, a variety of locations, and an army of supporting characters. The main events of a short story should occur in a relatively short period of time (days or even minutes), and you typically won’t be able to develop effectively more than one plot, two or three main characters, and one setting. If your story has much more breadth, it probably needs to be a novella or novel.

From WikiHow

Search terms:
  • how to write a short story essay
  • how to write a short essay
  • how to start a short story essay
  • how to write an essay on a short story
  • write a short story about how you came down with a cold