Posts Tagged ‘Sat’

28
Feb

How To Master the ACT Writing Section

If you’re in high school, and are a junior or a senior, there’s a good chance that you’re already turning your attention ahead to college. More specifically, you are probably researching schools and trying to determine where you want to go. Do you want a traditional four-year university? A community college? An online school? A school, such as Argosy University, that combines elements of online and traditional teaching? Do you prefer an institution that is public or private? There are certainly many questions to ask yourself at this point.

But before you start spending all your free time browsing CollegeBoard.com or Online-Degree.com, it is important that you take the necessary steps to improve your candidacy at whatever school you ultimately choose. This means working to maintain (or boost) your grades, adding extracurricular and volunteer work to diversify your application, and taking the SAT or the ACT so that you can be considered for admission in the first place.

Originally used primarily by Midwestern schools, the ACT has grown considerably in usage and popularity in recent decades, and it now surpasses the SAT in many regards. In 2005, the ACT added a 30-minute writing section at the end of its administration. The writing section, scored on a scale from 6 to 12, has become increasingly useful in recent years to colleges that seek to assess the expository skills of their applicants.

There’s a good chance, then, that the ACT and the ACT writing section will fall somewhere on your path from high school to your dream college. Here are a few tips for easily boosting your scaled score and mastering the writing section:

Have an introduction and a conclusion. Even if your introduction seems weak and your conclusion is only a couple sentences long, breaking up your essay into the standard expository format can translate into an automatic 2 point boost on your scaled score.

Pick a side and stick to it. The ACT graders don’t care which side of an argument you support. They do care, however, that you support one side and present an explicit opinion to that effect. A student that vacillates between the two viewpoints will not be viewed favorably when grading occurs.

In the introduction, start general and end with a thesis. No matter what the essay topic, starting the introduction with a broad observation and ending it with a prescriptive thesis is sure to immediately put your essay in the top half of scorers. If the essay question is: “Should high school seniors get parking privileges over underclassmen?,” you may want to start your essay with this generic statement: “People have long debated whether seniority should entail special privileges at school.” You can then provide a couple filler sentences and then transition to your thesis statement: “Seniors should (or should not) get parking privileges for reasons X, Y, and Z.” This is a standard thesis format that can be used for any essay.

Think outside the box. Picking a side of the argument and then giving obvious supporting reasons can leave you with an essay that receives solid scores. But if you want to fall in the 10 to 12 range, you can get an added point or two by thinking outside the box. Using our previous example, a standard argument for senior parking privileges may be that there needs to be some sort of method to determine spots, it’s fair because everyone will eventually become a senior, and seniors are usually more responsible by virtue of their age. An out-of-the-box reason, however, may be that seniors might need to often leave school during the day for college interviews or internships.

Acknowledge the opposing view. Acknowledging that the other side of the argument has some validity will get you 1 to 2 easy points on the writing section. Don’t go on and on about the strengths of the opposition, simply provide one sentence where you point out an argument on the other side.

These are the main ways you can boost your score on the ACT writing section. While it may be difficult to improve the quality of your writing and of your grammar, any student should be able to learn these tips and then apply them when the time comes.

By Jennifer Smith

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22
May

Scholastic Aptitude Test

Taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test can be of immense value to any student interested in developing skill in technical fields such as gaining CCNA certification or seeking employment in any specialized field. Composed of three parts, it is designed to test literacy, problem solving, and communication skills. Although for most schools taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test is a prerequisite for entry, it would be on one’s best interest to check first before deciding whether or not to take the test. A number of schools feel that as a behavioral study it may be biased racially, ethnically, and economically. In any case, achieving a high score on the test can be of immense help in ongoing education and the subsequent quest for employment.

Of course the key to such success is to prepare yourself properly, as with any exam. The tests are given seven times a year and can be retaken, yet with proper preparation one can optimize their performance on the test. There are various ways one could do this. There are various on line tools that can be used, ranging from practice tests, to information to study. There are also many books that can be purchased that achieve the same purpose. Another method of test prep is a study class so that an instructor can help improve weak areas and reinforce strong ones. Another way is, of course, software. There are numerous options available to purchase software that offers tutorials and interactive mock tests that can grade your progress and point out the areas that need improvement. These can be quite useful as downloads when classes and tutors may be unavailable or hard to reach.

As mentioned above the SAT test is composed of three parts. The writing section of the test is composed of an essay as well as multiple choice questions. This section tests a student’s ability to express themselves and support their ideas, as well as proper written communication. The next section of the test deals with math, given multiple choice questions as well as a few student response questions. This is the problem solving section of the SAT as questions here range from algebra to data analysis. Finally, literacy is tested, in the critical reading section. The ability to read and comprehend quickly is the focus here, with sentence completion questions and a reading section followed by questions to be answered.

An important point to remember is that a blank question takes nothing away from the overall score, while an incorrect question may deduct points. Therefore it is better to leave an answer blank unless you can eliminate most of the multiple choice and make an educated guess.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1928802

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07
May

How to write a good Sat essay

Writing a Sat essay can be a bit stressful in the beginning. This is the stage, when you should take a deep breath and be ready to get into the writing process. Even if the task makes you to feel a bit confused, do not worry, as there are some great Sat essay tips that can help you to write a good Sat essay on any topic.  However, you should understand from the begging that there is no way for you to write a good Sat essay, if you do not use your brains.

Writing is, basically, a final stage which should be done when you know what you are going to write about. In order to get the right idea, you should start from a very simple, but at the same time, essential thing like reading the instructions. You should go through the instructions on the essay carefully and thoughtfully. You may think that the task is fully understood while you are reading the instruction, but you may be surprised how it is easy to miss some important points. So, before starting on doing something, you should realize clearly and fully what you are required to do and this is the first one of the Sat essay tips that you can use.

Thinking process is very important. You should understand what you need to get as the result. It is much easier and better to do something, if you know where it is leading you to.  This is why the second one of the Sat essay tips would be suggesting about checking out on the Sat essay examples.

Having seen the Sat essay examples, you will know what you are moving to. Visual examples are always good for better understanding what you will get in the end.

The third of the Sat essay tips will be learning the structure. You should to think through how much text you need to write and how it should be structured. In this case, you should rely on the standards. The Sat essay examples would be also a great help, as you not only will see how the text is structured, but also how one paragraph changes another.

The forth of the Sat essay tips will be suggestion about leaning the subject. Step by step, you should get comprehensive information and the core idea.

The core idea is something what your Sat essay will be built around. If you have noticed from the Sat essay examples, the first three-four lines give a clear idea what the essay is about. In the next parts you will develop the idea, providing facts and arguments in order to make one logical conclusion. Finalizing your writing will be the ending part of your essay.

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  • how to write a good sat essay
  • sat essay tips
  • how should i write my sat essay
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