Posts Tagged ‘personal experience’

23
Mar

How do I Write a Praxis Essay?

The Praxis essay section is 30 minutes long and contains only one question. It asks you to reflect on your personal experience and observations and to use them for information, examples, and even generalizations throughout the writing process. The essay question generates a raw score that ranges from 2 to 12. This section of the exam tests your ability to read through the topic carefully, organize your argument before drafting the essay and then write it lucidly and concisely. The essay requires basic knowledge of college-level writing. Papers are scored on the writer’s ability to achieve a good level of organization and the development of ideas with supporting evidence of specific examples; identifying the essay’s intended audience; understanding of the assignment; masterful use of language; and accuracy of usage, mechanics and paragraphing.

  • Carefully read through and examine the prompt. The Praxis essay topics ask you to discuss your stance on a given statement. This implies that you may either completely agree or disagree with a statement. In addition, you may use a middle-ground approach to your essay if that works best for you.
  • Plan your essay for at least eight minutes. The planning is essential, because it will actually enhance the quality of the essay. Before you start writing, be sure to make a list of all your supporting details. Then select two or three of your finest arguments and organize them logically. Organizing the arguments in advance is critical, especially if you are taking the paper-based Praxis exam, as you would not be able to reorder huge chunks of the text once you have begun writing. Analyze and discuss your points in an interesting way.
  • Draft the essay. Try to finish your draft in 15 minutes so you can have at least a few minutes to reread the essay at the end.
  • Include a concise and clear introduction to your topic, but don’t spend too much time on it.
  • Add an effective conclusion to the essay that accurately sums up the main points and evaluates the benefits.
  • Use the remaining time to revise the essay. Read your draft carefully, looking for omitted words, awkward phrasing, problematic transitions and similar issues. Pay close attention to errors in sentence structure and subject-verb agreement. In addition, be sure to avoid the use of the second-person pronoun “you” in your writing.
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30
Jun

Factors for assessing essay

Most of the essays are written as an academic exercise, and it is important to strike a balance between form and content. In order not to be trapped, we must remember that the evaluation is done using several factors. Let’s list them.

The content of essays. An assessor evaluates if you have understood and formulated the problem of the essay. Не also looks if you have commented the problem without factual errors related to its understanding.

If you have quoted somebody on the chosen topic, you have to reflect the position of the author’s original text commenting an issue. You also have to express an opinion on the issue stated by you, agree or disagree with the position of the author’s text (if essay is written about certain author’s work), arguing and citing at least two arguments, one of which is taken from the artistic, journalistic or scientific literature.

Deliberately losing options:

– To present your own position on the matter raised at the household level, without argument,

– To ignore problem disclosing or information that doesn’t lie in context of essay giving (the facts of social life or personal experience).

Essays are usually not assessed for the position, but for the credibility of the arguments. However, the position should be clearly marked.

Speech processing works. Here semantic integrity, voice connectivity and sequence of presentation are evaluated: the lack of logical errors and violations of the indention of dividing the text. The accuracy and expressiveness of speech, a variety of grammatical structure of speech are also taken into account.

Literacy. Compliance with spelling, punctuation and grammar rules, absence of errors are factors to evaluate essay as well. Propriety and compliance with the factual accuracy of the background material are necessary for receiving a good mark for an essay.

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13
Jun

How to Start a Narrative Essay for English

A “narrative essay” is also called a “reflective essay” because the writer describes something important to the writer. The narrative may also be a story about something that happened to the writer. You can write about anything you want to write about, and there are no limitations on the topic for a narrative essay. Most narrative essays are written in the first person, and the narrative can be written about something that happened to someone else as observed or understood by you. A narrative essay will engage your readers in a personal experience or personal point of view.

Decide on a theme or central idea for your narrative essay. Make the theme anything you decide to write about. State generally a personal experience or an observation that represents something important and true about your life. The introductory paragraph should let the reader know that the writing is a narrative. Begin your narrative essay with “I” and then tell the reader what the essay is about. For example, “I went to Spain as an exchange student in 1986” would be a good way to start a narrative essay about an important experience while traveling.

Use details and descriptive language in your essay. Your narrative should stir the imagination of your readers and hold their interest. Describe the way things smelled, how they looked and how you felt when writing about events. Give the reader details about the appearance and demeanor of the other characters in your narrative. Answer the following questions: Who did the event happen to? Where did the event take place? When did this event happen?

Use anecdotes about people in your narrative essay. Avoid using trite expressions or clichés when possible. Anecdotes can help the reader to understand “why” the characters in your narrative behave as you describe them.

Read more: How to Start a Narrative Essay for English | eHow.com

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