Posts Tagged ‘literature’

12
Mar

How to Effectively Edit Your Own Writing

It’s almost a requirement that you have a third-party read over anything you’ve written prior to submission.  In addition to invaluable feedback and criticism, an extra pair of eyes are useful in catching grammar and spelling mistakes you may have otherwise missed.  But unfortunately not everyone has the luxury of having someone on hand to read their work.  In such times it’s critical that writers learn how to edit by themselves.  Here’s a list of five tips that are sure to help you become a better self-editor in the event you are your only proofreader prior to submission:

Wait 24 hours: Recently written words have a tendency to be read in our heads as we intended to write them, making possible mistakes hard to sniff out.  Waiting a day or two to edit your own work allows you time to lose familiarity with the writing and better detect errors.

Read it out loud: Speaking your words out loud not only helps you improve the flow of your writing, it enables you to catch grammatical mistakes you could be missing on account of “looking” for errors rather than sensing them as an absorber of information.

Read it backwards: Another clever way to outwit your brain’s habit of scanning over the finer details of writing is to read your work backwards.  By separating your work into individual sentences that don’t flow together, you can focus more on the specifics of each written thought or idea.

Know your most common mistakes: Old habits die hard (kind of like clichés) and it’s important that writers remember where their work tends to be its weakest.  That way you can be on a look out for the specific errors you make the most.  Write a list if you have to, but try and commit it to memory.

Proofread all the time: Whether reading an article in the New York Times or poring over medical coding industry news on your smartphone, always be on the lookout for spelling errors and poor grammar.  Not only is it exciting to uncover mistakes in mainstream media and printed literature, it trains you to become a natural editor which in turn helps you better proofread your own writing.

Editing should always be done by somebody else.  But the reality for most writers, especially those of you in school, is that proofreading must be done by yourself.  If this is the case, then become a better self-editor by incorporating the aforementioned tips into your proofreading plan.

By Jennifer Smith

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27
Dec

How to Write a Literary Essay

A literary essay explains the contextual meaning behind a piece of literature while paying attention to specific details, such as structure and style. This essay form also gives its author a chance to argue complex points in the text by comparing his viewpoint to critical analysis of the piece. The structure of a literary essay is a series of paragraphs stating, building upon, and proving, then reiterating your points in a conclusion.

Organizing a Literary Essay

  1. Read the piece of literature you will be writing about. Reread any sections that are confusing. Take notes on notecards about major elements of the text, including structure, style, point of view, plot and subplot.
  2. Read books and articles that discuss various aspects and opinions of the piece of literature you are writing about. Arrange notecards in front of your work area while you study these critical texts. Write down and even highlight any points in the critical texts that you want to incorporate into your essay.
  3. Arrange notecards in front of your after you are finished reading the text and any critical analysis of the text from other sources. Include the name of the author an title of the text you are citing on your notecards. Choose a point of view that you would like to expand on about the piece of literature.
  4. Write a topic, or thesis sentence, that makes it clear to your audience the text you are studying and the viewpoint you will be discussing. The scope and argument of your viewpoint, and whether it supports the critical analysis or refutes it, will determine the length and structure of your literary essay. Refer to your notecards about the text and the analysis as you write.
  5. Arrange your essay in a paragraph structure. Though similar to the more elementary five-paragraph essay form, the literary essay takes longer to explain and develop its point. Write two to three opening paragraphs about your viewpoint and to alert readers on what specific aspects of the text you will discuss in the body of the essay.
  6. Write multiple paragraphs, depending on the scope of your theme, to argue your viewpoint about the text. Analyze the analysis, deepen the reader’s understanding of the text, highlight specific plot points, argue for or against other analysis.
  7. Write concluding paragraphs to end the essay, making sure to reiterate your viewpoint and add an additional fact or two about the literary text. Include a works cited page at the back of your essay to list all the source materials researched for your essay.
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30
Jun

Factors for assessing essay

Most of the essays are written as an academic exercise, and it is important to strike a balance between form and content. In order not to be trapped, we must remember that the evaluation is done using several factors. Let’s list them.

The content of essays. An assessor evaluates if you have understood and formulated the problem of the essay. Не also looks if you have commented the problem without factual errors related to its understanding.

If you have quoted somebody on the chosen topic, you have to reflect the position of the author’s original text commenting an issue. You also have to express an opinion on the issue stated by you, agree or disagree with the position of the author’s text (if essay is written about certain author’s work), arguing and citing at least two arguments, one of which is taken from the artistic, journalistic or scientific literature.

Deliberately losing options:

– To present your own position on the matter raised at the household level, without argument,

– To ignore problem disclosing or information that doesn’t lie in context of essay giving (the facts of social life or personal experience).

Essays are usually not assessed for the position, but for the credibility of the arguments. However, the position should be clearly marked.

Speech processing works. Here semantic integrity, voice connectivity and sequence of presentation are evaluated: the lack of logical errors and violations of the indention of dividing the text. The accuracy and expressiveness of speech, a variety of grammatical structure of speech are also taken into account.

Literacy. Compliance with spelling, punctuation and grammar rules, absence of errors are factors to evaluate essay as well. Propriety and compliance with the factual accuracy of the background material are necessary for receiving a good mark for an essay.

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