Posts Tagged ‘introductory paragraph’

09
Sep

AP Essay Writing Tips

AP classes are college-level courses offered at high schools across the United States. These classes are recognized by more than 90 percent of colleges and universities. In order to receive credit for a class though, students must take an AP exam at the end of the course, which includes an essay for social science, history and English courses.

Study

Students need to show that they have a deep and broad understanding of the subject they are writing about. As a result, students should start studying for the AP exam several weeks in advance so that they can review all of the material that was previously covered in class. The people who review AP essays are looking to see that students can provide specific facts and evidence to support their arguments, and not just general ideas.

Practice

Writing a strong essay requires more than just knowing the right facts. AP essays are timed, and students should accustom themselves to writing under these strict constraints. The amount of time for each essay depends on the test, but students should prepare to write most essays in 30 to 45 minutes. Writing practice essays also helps prepare students for the types of questions that they may be asked. The College Board, which runs the AP exams, offers sample essay questions through its website.

Carefully Read the Question

In an effort to begin writing as quickly as possible, students often fail to read the essay question carefully. In order to receive full credit, students need to make sure that they answer all parts of the question completely. Taking the time to reread the question and think about what the test is asking can help students write better essays.

Plan

Even though the test is timed, taking a few minutes to write and craft a plan for the essay is time well spent. Students who plan out their essay can help ensure that their writing is clear, organized and detailed enough to answer all parts of the question. This is also a good time to think about the evidence needed to support the essay’s thesis or argument.

Write Clearly

Students should begin with an introductory paragraph that clearly states their thesis for the essay. Following paragraphs should make their points clearly and early on in the paragraph to avoid confusing the reader. Each paragraph should directly support the thesis and provide specific evidence instead of broad generalizations. Writing a short conclusion helps sum up the essay’s points and re-emphasize the thesis.

Proofread

Although students have little time to execute their essays, it’s still a good idea to proofread quickly if time permits. Doing so helps catch spelling and grammar errors that may detract from the essay.

Search terms:
  • writing an introduction for a narrative essay
  • personal plan outline & introductory paragraph
  • personal plan outline introductory paragraph
  • ap argument essay writing tips
  • narrative essay introduction paragraph
  • introduction of a personal narrative essay
  • introcustion paragrah narrative essays
  • AP writing the essay advice
  • ap essay writing strategies
  • Examples of introductive narrative paragraph for anglo-saxon paper
13
Jun

How to Start a Narrative Essay for English

A “narrative essay” is also called a “reflective essay” because the writer describes something important to the writer. The narrative may also be a story about something that happened to the writer. You can write about anything you want to write about, and there are no limitations on the topic for a narrative essay. Most narrative essays are written in the first person, and the narrative can be written about something that happened to someone else as observed or understood by you. A narrative essay will engage your readers in a personal experience or personal point of view.

Decide on a theme or central idea for your narrative essay. Make the theme anything you decide to write about. State generally a personal experience or an observation that represents something important and true about your life. The introductory paragraph should let the reader know that the writing is a narrative. Begin your narrative essay with “I” and then tell the reader what the essay is about. For example, “I went to Spain as an exchange student in 1986″ would be a good way to start a narrative essay about an important experience while traveling.

Use details and descriptive language in your essay. Your narrative should stir the imagination of your readers and hold their interest. Describe the way things smelled, how they looked and how you felt when writing about events. Give the reader details about the appearance and demeanor of the other characters in your narrative. Answer the following questions: Who did the event happen to? Where did the event take place? When did this event happen?

Use anecdotes about people in your narrative essay. Avoid using trite expressions or clichés when possible. Anecdotes can help the reader to understand “why” the characters in your narrative behave as you describe them.

Read more: How to Start a Narrative Essay for English | eHow.com

Search terms:
  • how to start a narrative essay
  • how to start off a narrative essay
  • how to start a narrative
  • how to start a personal narrative
  • how to begin a narrative essay
  • reflective narrative essay examples
  • how to start a narrative story
  • starting a narrative essay
  • how to start a personal narrative essay
  • ways to start a narrative essay
09
Jun

How to Start an Essay

High school students are expected to write essays in most content areas. Their essays may be descriptive, expository, persuasive, or essays designed for specific classes such as science. Whatever the essay assignment, some fundamental parts of an essay are applicable, regardless of the type. There are also some basic steps needed to start an essay in order to keep the essay focused, organized and manageable.

Pick a topic. Most likely, your teacher will give you a list of subjects. Choose a topic that you have some familiarity with and something that interests you. If you enjoy the topic, you will be more apt to understand the research and have a desire to learn about the subject. Research and then narrow the topic. If you choose dogs, what is it that you want to talk about? Make a list of three to five possible subtopics: how to choose a dog, the best kind of dog, or how to buy a crate for a dog. From your list, you will choose one narrowed topic.

Write a preliminary thesis. The thesis statement is a statement of position. It directs the paper by stating what the content is. The thesis is not a question, but one statement that should be positioned at the end of the introductory paragraph. If you decide to write about choosing a dog, you may choose a preliminary statement as follows: When choosing a dog, consider the costs, size, and needs of the dog. The thesis organizes the paper. The paper may be about the costs of raising a dog, the size of the space required for the dog, and the attention the dog will need. Notice the thesis is general. You will make the thesis more specific once you have written the paper and know exactly what you want to discuss under costs, size and needs.

Visualize an upside-down triangle. This may sound strange, but a good introduction will drive the rest of the paper. The paper will fall into place because it’s organized, focused, and manageable. Begin with a general statement and slowly narrow that statement to the thesis, which is the tip of the upside-down triangle. If you’re writing about choosing a dog, begin with a general statement about the benefits of owning a dog. From there, discuss benefits and why it’s important to choose a dog carefully. End with your thesis. The introduction will be about seven sentences in length, or half of a page.

Include transition. As you visualize the upside-down triangle, you need to make each sentence of the introduction transition to the next sentence in order to narrow the material. Your goal is to narrow the broad introductory sentence down to the thesis. Use transitional devices such as transitional words: therefore, however, since, finally. Transitional words will help your writing flow to the thesis statement.

Review the introduction and thesis statement. Ask yourself the following: Does this introduction lead into the topic I really want to write about? Do I need to rewrite the thesis to make it more specific to my topic? Can I develop an essay based on this introduction? Do I need to lengthen or shorten the introduction? Is my writing clear and focused? Once you are satisfied with the introduction, you have a start to writing an essay.

Read more: How to Start an Essay | eHow.com

Search terms:
  • how to start an essay
  • how to start a paper
  • ways to start an essay
  • how to start a essay
  • how to start a composition
  • how to begin a paper
  • how to begin an essay
  • ways to start a composition
  • ways to start a paper
  • how to start essays
Page 1 of 212