Posts Tagged ‘critical reading’

22
May

Scholastic Aptitude Test

Taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test can be of immense value to any student interested in developing skill in technical fields such as gaining CCNA certification or seeking employment in any specialized field. Composed of three parts, it is designed to test literacy, problem solving, and communication skills. Although for most schools taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test is a prerequisite for entry, it would be on one’s best interest to check first before deciding whether or not to take the test. A number of schools feel that as a behavioral study it may be biased racially, ethnically, and economically. In any case, achieving a high score on the test can be of immense help in ongoing education and the subsequent quest for employment.

Of course the key to such success is to prepare yourself properly, as with any exam. The tests are given seven times a year and can be retaken, yet with proper preparation one can optimize their performance on the test. There are various ways one could do this. There are various on line tools that can be used, ranging from practice tests, to information to study. There are also many books that can be purchased that achieve the same purpose. Another method of test prep is a study class so that an instructor can help improve weak areas and reinforce strong ones. Another way is, of course, software. There are numerous options available to purchase software that offers tutorials and interactive mock tests that can grade your progress and point out the areas that need improvement. These can be quite useful as downloads when classes and tutors may be unavailable or hard to reach.

As mentioned above the SAT test is composed of three parts. The writing section of the test is composed of an essay as well as multiple choice questions. This section tests a student’s ability to express themselves and support their ideas, as well as proper written communication. The next section of the test deals with math, given multiple choice questions as well as a few student response questions. This is the problem solving section of the SAT as questions here range from algebra to data analysis. Finally, literacy is tested, in the critical reading section. The ability to read and comprehend quickly is the focus here, with sentence completion questions and a reading section followed by questions to be answered.

An important point to remember is that a blank question takes nothing away from the overall score, while an incorrect question may deduct points. Therefore it is better to leave an answer blank unless you can eliminate most of the multiple choice and make an educated guess.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/1928802

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04
Jun

Sat – Myths and Truths

The SAT Reasoning Test, previously known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, is a standardized test, mainly used by colleges and universities in the US to select students for admission. The programme consists of the SAT Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Tests. The SAT is three hours and 45 minutes long and measures skills in three areas: critical reading, math, and writing. Although most of the questions are multiple choice, students are also required to write a 25-minute essay.
The SAT Subject Tests, on the other hand,?are a one-hour, mostly multiple-choice test in specific subjects. These tests measure knowledge of particular subjects and the ability to apply that knowledge. The SAT is offered seven times a year in the United States. Students can prepare for the test with the help of books, tutors, or online   programs. It is published and marked by the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

The SAT has been the subject of controversy ever since it was introduced. It has been described as racist, sexist and a very inaccurate pointer to a person’s real abilities. Because of the way it’s constructed, its high pace, and inherent cultural biases, the SAT denies African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and women equal opportunities for higher education.
It’s almost become de rigueur now for students to attend expensive coaching classes for excellent scores on the SAT, for admissions in top universities. So many myths have sprung up around the SAT, that it’s become something of a bugbear for the academic community in general. It’s time we debunked some of these myths (and earn the gratitude of the long-suffering students).

Myth 1: SAT tests alone determine your chances of admission.
Absolutely untrue. While it’s true that the test does play a role in the admissions process, it’s not the only determinant to college admission. The reality is that when admissions officers evaluate students’ applications, they take into consideration evaluation letters, essays, academic records, awards, work experience, extracurricular activities, to get a clear view of the candidate’s all-round abilities. It is fallacious to assume that the SAT alone determines your chances of getting into the college of your choice abroad.

Myth 2: One has to score over 1350 to get into any of the Ivy League colleges.

This is another of those enduring myths. Many guidebooks provide a median score for each school, which indicates the score at which half the students scored better and half scored worse. A few schools’ list ranges between which most of their admitted students scored. One should keep in mind that every year thousands of students with good academic records but lower than average test scores are admitted to top schools.