Posts Tagged ‘colleges and universities’

09
Sep

AP Essay Writing Tips

AP classes are college-level courses offered at high schools across the United States. These classes are recognized by more than 90 percent of colleges and universities. In order to receive credit for a class though, students must take an AP exam at the end of the course, which includes an essay for social science, history and English courses.

Study

Students need to show that they have a deep and broad understanding of the subject they are writing about. As a result, students should start studying for the AP exam several weeks in advance so that they can review all of the material that was previously covered in class. The people who review AP essays are looking to see that students can provide specific facts and evidence to support their arguments, and not just general ideas.

Practice

Writing a strong essay requires more than just knowing the right facts. AP essays are timed, and students should accustom themselves to writing under these strict constraints. The amount of time for each essay depends on the test, but students should prepare to write most essays in 30 to 45 minutes. Writing practice essays also helps prepare students for the types of questions that they may be asked. The College Board, which runs the AP exams, offers sample essay questions through its website.

Carefully Read the Question

In an effort to begin writing as quickly as possible, students often fail to read the essay question carefully. In order to receive full credit, students need to make sure that they answer all parts of the question completely. Taking the time to reread the question and think about what the test is asking can help students write better essays.

Plan

Even though the test is timed, taking a few minutes to write and craft a plan for the essay is time well spent. Students who plan out their essay can help ensure that their writing is clear, organized and detailed enough to answer all parts of the question. This is also a good time to think about the evidence needed to support the essay’s thesis or argument.

Write Clearly

Students should begin with an introductory paragraph that clearly states their thesis for the essay. Following paragraphs should make their points clearly and early on in the paragraph to avoid confusing the reader. Each paragraph should directly support the thesis and provide specific evidence instead of broad generalizations. Writing a short conclusion helps sum up the essay’s points and re-emphasize the thesis.

Proofread

Although students have little time to execute their essays, it’s still a good idea to proofread quickly if time permits. Doing so helps catch spelling and grammar errors that may detract from the essay.

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25
Aug

The Best Courses to Prepare for College

Going to college is an exciting stage in the life of a teenager filled with the anticipation of being away from home and independent for the first time. One aspect of this process includes meeting the academic admission requirements. College preparatory classes help students who choose the college track to take the classes needed, no matter which type of college or university you decide to attend.

English

In addition to mandatory freshman and sophomore English classes, four additional semesters in language arts sets high school students on a college track. College prep English course options are plentiful, depending on the school you attend. Language arts classes that best prepare students for college include an array based in literature. World, American and British literature courses help college-bound students develop literary analysis skills befitting a college freshman.

Science

Most schools have only a limited number of science classes available. To fulfill most college and university requirements of four years of science, students may end up taking all the science classes offered at their school. Biology and chemistry not only fulfill college admission requirements for science but meet the lab requirements as well.

Social Studies

When your educational path is college-oriented, eight semesters social studies classes are required. Gone are the days when social studies classes consisted only of U.S. and world history. Social studies classes also include world geography, and most high schools have a civics requirement for graduation. College-bound students also have social studies options that include psychology and sociology.

Foreign Language

One area in which state schools and elite universities differ in admission requirements is foreign language. Most colleges and universities require students to have at least two years of the same foreign language, but Ivy League institutions such as Princeton expect their incoming freshmen to have four years of the same foreign language. Meeting this requirement for college admission is open to whichever languages you can take in school, such as Spanish, French and, in some schools, German and Latin.

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04
Jun

Sat – Myths and Truths

The SAT Reasoning Test, previously known as the Scholastic Aptitude Test and Scholastic Assessment Test, is a standardized test, mainly used by colleges and universities in the US to select students for admission. The programme consists of the SAT Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Tests. The SAT is three hours and 45 minutes long and measures skills in three areas: critical reading, math, and writing. Although most of the questions are multiple choice, students are also required to write a 25-minute essay.
The SAT Subject Tests, on the other hand,?are a one-hour, mostly multiple-choice test in specific subjects. These tests measure knowledge of particular subjects and the ability to apply that knowledge. The SAT is offered seven times a year in the United States. Students can prepare for the test with the help of books, tutors, or online   programs. It is published and marked by the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

The SAT has been the subject of controversy ever since it was introduced. It has been described as racist, sexist and a very inaccurate pointer to a person’s real abilities. Because of the way it’s constructed, its high pace, and inherent cultural biases, the SAT denies African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and women equal opportunities for higher education.
It’s almost become de rigueur now for students to attend expensive coaching classes for excellent scores on the SAT, for admissions in top universities. So many myths have sprung up around the SAT, that it’s become something of a bugbear for the academic community in general. It’s time we debunked some of these myths (and earn the gratitude of the long-suffering students).

Myth 1: SAT tests alone determine your chances of admission.
Absolutely untrue. While it’s true that the test does play a role in the admissions process, it’s not the only determinant to college admission. The reality is that when admissions officers evaluate students’ applications, they take into consideration evaluation letters, essays, academic records, awards, work experience, extracurricular activities, to get a clear view of the candidate’s all-round abilities. It is fallacious to assume that the SAT alone determines your chances of getting into the college of your choice abroad.

Myth 2: One has to score over 1350 to get into any of the Ivy League colleges.

This is another of those enduring myths. Many guidebooks provide a median score for each school, which indicates the score at which half the students scored better and half scored worse. A few schools’ list ranges between which most of their admitted students scored. One should keep in mind that every year thousands of students with good academic records but lower than average test scores are admitted to top schools.

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