15
Feb

How to Write a Descriptive Narrative Essay

The purpose of a narrative descriptive essay is to tell a story vividly to appeal to the reader’s senses. The more sensory images, or description, that is used to tell a story, the more interesting it will be to readers. Narrative descriptive essays are commonly assigned in first-year college writing classes, and writing one involves many steps.

  1. Choose an effective, interesting topic. The story you want to tell should be interesting. While a simple vacation to Florida may have been fun and interesting to you, think about whether it will be to your reader. Choose a topic that includes lots of sensory impressions so that you have lots to describe.
  2. Make an outline of the basic story you want to tell. Obviously, you need a beginning, middle and end. Having an outline of the story will keep the essay organized and help keep you on track in telling the story.
  3. Decide on the type of description to include. What images do you want to impress upon the reader?
  4. Write a statement of purpose. You probably won’t have a traditional thesis statement in a narrative essay, but you should have a clear purpose. What story are you telling, and why are you telling it?
  5. Write a clear introduction that tells the reader what story will follow. Include the purpose in the introduction. The introduction should hook the reader and make him want to read the story. For this type of essay, use a catchy opening line that is linked to your story.
  6. Tell the complete story in the body. Clearly tell the story that you have mentioned in the purpose.
  7. Organize the body chronologically. Because you are telling a story, you obviously want to tell it in order. Choosing a different organizational method may be confusing to the readers.
  8. Use lots of descriptive language. You want to paint a picture for the reader so she feels she is part of the story. Use description to set the scene. Describe people, events and other things as they come up in the story.
  9. Describe sounds, appearances, smells and anything else to make the story more interesting and real.
  10. Describe only what is pertinent to the story and moves the story along. Do not describe something in the essay that really isn’t relevant to the story.
  11. Write a conclusion that sums up the essay and leaves the reader with a parting word. What do you want readers to take away from the story?
09
Feb

About Differential Aptitude Tests

The U.S. Department of Education’s Educational Resources Information Center states that Differential Aptitude Test measures people’s ability to succeed in the work force. Employers use these aptitude tests to determine applicants’ cognitive skills as well as clerical and language skills. The eight sections of Differential Aptitude Tests provide an easy way to assess your skills for jobs in management and other industries.

Verbal and Numerical Reasoning

Differential Aptitude Tests measure your verbal- and numerical-reasoning skills. These sections of the test assess how well you understand ideas expressed in word and in numbers.

Abstract Reasoning

These tests examine your ability to understand abstract ideas when there are no words or numbers to guide you.

Perceptual Speed and Accuracy

Differential Aptitude Tests measure your skills for working in places such as offices, scientific laboratories, stores and warehouses. The skills evaluated include completing paperwork, filing and checking data.

Mechanical Reasoning

These tests test how easily you grasp physics laws governing everyday life, such as understanding machinery, tools and body movement.

Space Relations

This section of Differential Aptitude Tests accesses your ability to visualize 3-D pictures of solid objects by looking at the objects on paper.

Spelling

The spelling section of Differential Aptitude Tests accesses how well you can identify the correct spelling of common English words.

Language Usage

This section of Differential Aptitude Tests accesses your command of the English language. It examines punctuation, capitalization and word choice.

02
Feb

How To Improve Your Writing

Whether you’re pursuing a career as an entrepreneur, an academic writer, a marketer, or a blogger, few things are more important to your future than polishing your skills as a writer. A verbal pitch can go a long way, but at some point you’re going to have to put your ideas onto paper, or word document, and that’s when a project can get cumbersome. Even the process of corresponding with businesses or corporate financial entities becomes more fluid when you possess solid writing skills. If you’re applying for a Discover student loan, for instance, and you craft a compelling letter to the Executive Account Manager, your chances of success rise significantly higher. With that said, here are few time-weathered strategies for improving your written content:

Organize and outline. Do not start writing until you have a solid outline. This doesn’t just mean a few phrases scribbled in haste. Your outline should act as a guide to every section of your missive. Not only do you want a beginning, middle, and end to the content as a whole, you should work to build in beginnings, middles, and ends, to each individual section as well. This will keep your post feeling organized and on-point. Many papers, blogs and marketing copy go awry because they are disorganized, and because the author didn’t work off of a solid outline. You wouldn’t start building a tower without a blueprint, would you?

Have a thesis, and several sub-theses. Your paper, blog, pitch, or story should have an overall thesis that you are working toward illustrating. All of your points and examples should be supporting this central thesis. You should also have several smaller theses that back up the main one in different ways. If you’re writing a blog post or marketing pitch, your ‘headers’ would be your sub-theses. They are their own points, but work to affirm aspects of your overall point.

Write clearly, concisely, and powerfully. These are three characteristics that are hard to combine. Many people would think that if you write clearly and concisely, you can’t also write powerfully. But writing powerfully doesn’t mean using obtuse metaphors or stringing together Faulkner-like sentences that leave your readers feeling bewildered. Writing powerfully requires that you be clear and concise. Use adjectives sparingly. Be economical with page space. Don’t compare patently human endeavors with poetic cosmic cycles too often.

Being a good writer doesn’t require that you memorize the dictionary or try in vain to imitate classic authors. Being a good writer means scribing in an organized, concise, purpose-driven manner. You must treat the act of writing as craft, with structural components that you constantly work to improve upon.

By Jennifer Smith

Page 29 of 66« First...1020...2728293031...405060...Last »